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Early Carolina. John Locke, Henry Woodward, and sensual Native Americans

“What we can know with any confidence derives from the experience of the senses.” – John Locke (1632-1704) from “An Essay Concerning Human Understanding” I am an artist, not a formal historian, philosopher, or genealogist. My take on the world

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Posted in Arts & Culture, beauty, Charleston South Carolina, Native American, religion, South Carolina History, travel, Writing

McLeod Plantation History on James Island

Historian Doug Bostick spoke about the McLeod Plantation at the meeting of the Town of James Island’s History and Preservation Committee on March 9, 2010 at 8:10 pm.  The meeting was held at the Town Hall Offices, located at 1238 B Camp Road, James Island,  South Carolina.  The following text was taken directly from the minutes: There are 99 known graves on the McLeod property, and other headstones in the Woodland area, and some

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Posted in architecture, art, Arts & Culture, beauty, Charleston South Carolina, creativity, Food, Green, Gullah, Law, Native American, South Carolina History, travel

Gullah Geechee Cultural Preservation

Preserving the history of this culture, so rich in song and spirit is important. Today’s post is a request for action. Kindly log on to Washington Watch and say “Yes, funding this is important.” For more visit the pages at

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Posted in architecture, art, Arts & Culture, beauty, Charleston South Carolina, creativity, Food, Green, Gullah, Law, music, Native American, Poetry, religion, South Carolina History, spirituality, sustainable living, travel, Writing

Togetherness!

“The pride which the cassique of Kiawah took in his harbor and his country was responsible for the settling there of the first English colony in South Carolina. The same pardonable pride is still characteristic of the inhabitants….” – Alexander

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Posted in architecture, Arts & Culture, beauty, Charleston South Carolina, Gullah, Native American, religion, South Carolina History

A Love Story of Rice and Dr. Henry Woodward

The following “Legend” was found in a little red book by E.C. McCants (Dr. Elliot Crayton McCants, PhD 1865-1953) called History Stories and Legends of South Carolina, 1927, The Southern Publishing Co. Dallas, Texas. The book was brought to me

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Posted in Arts & Culture, Charleston South Carolina, Food, Native American, Poetry, South Carolina History

Shadows of the Moon

The “Wolf Moon” in her brightest fullest self arrives at midnight tonight. Named by Native Americans, I understand. I hear my own hungry wolves in the depths of winter. On Edisto Island, where the vast sky is uninterrupted by street

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Posted in art, Arts & Culture, beauty, creativity, Native American, Poetry, religion, travel, Writing

Edisto Island is Poetry

It is weight that gives meaning to weightlessness. -Isamu Noguchi Edisto Island, a place of uncommon natural beauty, is poetry. From the twenty miles of serpentine highway to the sea, through Tarzan-and-Jane jungles of dark forest, past the genuine Serpentarium,

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Posted in art, Arts & Culture, beauty, creativity, Gullah, Native American, Poetry, religion, South Carolina History, spirituality, travel, women, Writing

John Locke, Henry Woodward and Edisto Island, South Carolina

Letters are among the most significant memorial a person can leave behind them. ~Johann Wolfgang von Goethe Briefly, in the dreams of the early South Carolina colony, a perfect little island south of Charleston, was picked by the Lords Proprietors,

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Posted in Arts & Culture, Charleston South Carolina, Native American, religion, South Carolina History, Writing

Dr. Henry Woodward, and Edisto Island 1666

It’s not a dirt row-ud now. It’s what an Edisto islander once called one of those newly paved main roads. In dialect so distinctive of the sea islands, Point of Pines Road would have been called a “rock row-ud” once

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Posted in architecture, art, Arts & Culture, beauty, Charleston South Carolina, creativity, Native American, South Carolina History, travel, Writing

Red Bird Who Knows the Tide

“Red bird came…firing up the landscape…as nothing else could.” A poet friend sent me a book this week called Red Bird. It is a book of delectable poems by Mary Oliver, who also lives by the sea. On Edisto Island,

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Posted in art, Arts & Culture, Charleston South Carolina, Native American, Poetry, religion, South Carolina History, spirituality, Writing

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What’s this?

Welcome to my blog about the Lowcountry of South Carolina, a place proud with beauty, history and art. Sometimes we feel a call, to be, to go, to do. I was called to be an artist, and as an old midwife from Alabama said, “If the good Lord wants you to do something, you won’t have no good luck until you do it.”

So here I am writing about what I know, about the 'under glimmer' as the poet Basho, says, the way I have learned to see, to notice. I am inspired by, and talking about the history and art and culture of this place that has called me to herself. By the ancestors.

My background includes a degree in fine arts from a small private college in Florida, and before that, four years of all girls' boarding school in Asheville. I worked as a professional photographer, helped my children grow up, and now and I love seasoned things, good food, better conversation, beauty, my beloved and beautiful Italian Greyhound, Beau. Moved by the sacred places and stories of this beautiful historic land called the Lowcountry, I am here in spirit and I hope to infect you with my love of this place.

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